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My photo by Riad Ezzat

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Quate of the day

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Human Resources Issues

A Manager’s Job Is Making Sure Employees Have a Life Outside Work by Arjun Dev Arora and Raman Frey MARCH 25, 2016   A young man with cancer at our Silicon Valley firm requested additional sick time for postcancer treatments and checkups. Another employee, one who had been born in Vietnam and came to this country with his parents, requested one day per month when he would work remotely. He would return to south central Los Angeles to work a double shift at his parents’ liquor store. Setting up his laptop there meant that his parents could take a brief break from their sixteen-hour days. Perhaps these seem like reasonable requests that any humane manager would approve. And in both cases, as their supervisors, we did grant these requests. And yet more often than not, the unspoken rules of “killing it” here in Silicon Valley might prevent people like these from even mentioning their needs to their managers. If you’re not sleeping under your desk, you’re not committed — an attitude we sometimes refer to as “martyr capitalism.” It’s not just that we want our employees and collaborators to get their jobs done — that’s a given — we want to see them thrive both in and out of the

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Christmas or Christmas Day

 Christmas or Christmas Day  is an annual festival commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ, observed generally on December 25 A feast central to the Christian liturgical year, it closes the Advent season and initiates the twelve days of Christmastide, which ends after the twelfth night. Christmas is a public holiday in many of the world's nations, is celebrated culturally by a large number of non-Christian people, and is an integral part of the Christmas and holiday season. While the birth year of Jesus is estimated among modern historians to have been between 7 and 2 BC, the exact month and day of his birth are unknown, and are not the focus of the Church's Christmas celebration. a date later adopted in the East, although some churches celebrate on the December 25 of the older Julian calendar, which, in the Gregorian calendar, currently corresponds to January 7, the day after the Western Christian Church celebrates the Epiphany. The Council of Tours of 567 "declared the twelve days between Christmas and Epiphany to be one unified festal cycle", thus giving significance to both December 25 and January 6. The Second Council of Tours stated that: "There are feasts on each day between the Nativity of the Lord and Epiphany, except the three-day period on which our Fathers established for the beginning of January private Litanies in order to tread down the custom of the Gentiles. These three days it declared not to be joyful but to be days of penance and fasting. The date of Christmas may have initially been chosen to correspond with the day exactly nine months after early Christians believed Jesus to have been conceived, or with one or more ancient polytheistic festivals that occurred near southern solstice ; a further solar connection has been suggested because of a biblical verse identifying Jesus as the "Sun of righteousness". The celebratory customs associated in various countries with Christmas have a mix of pre-Christian, Christian, and secular themes and origins. Popular modern customs of the holiday include gift giving, completing an Advent calendar or Advent wreath, Christmas music and caroling, an exchange of Christmas cards, church services, a special meal, and the display of various Christmas decorations, including Christmas trees, Christmas lights, nativity scenes, garlands, wreaths, mistletoe, and holly. In addition, several closely related and often interchangeable figures, known as Santa Claus, Father Christmas, Saint Nicholas, and Christkind, are associated with bringing gifts to children during the Christmas season and have their own body of traditions and lore. Because gift-giving and many other aspects of the Christmas festival involve heightened economic activity, the holiday has become a significant event and a key sales period for retailers and businesses. The economic impact of Christmas is a factor that has grown steadily over the past few centuries in many regions of the world. Etymology   "Christmas" is a compound word originating in the term "Christ's Mass". It is derived from the Middle English Cristemasse, which is from Old English Crīstesmæsse, a phrase first recorded in 1038 Crīst  is from Greek Khrīstos, a translation of Hebrew Māšîaḥ, "Messiah", meaning "anointed"; and mæsse is from Latin missa, the celebration of the Eucharist. The form "Christenmas" was also historically used, but is now considered archaic and dialectal; it derives from Middle English Cristenmasse, literally "Christian mass". "Xmas" is an abbreviation of Christmas found particularly in print, based on the initial letter chi  in Greek Khrīstos, "Christ", though numerous style guides discourage its use; it has precedent in Middle English Χρ̄es masse . or, more rarely, as Nātiuiteð . "Nativity", meaning "birth", is from Latin nātīvitās. In Old English, Gēola  referred to the period corresponding to January and December, which was eventually equated with Christian Christmas. "Noel"  entered English in the late 14th century and is from the Old French noël or naël, itself ultimately from the Latin nātālis, " of birth". History   The Chronography of 354 AD contains early evidence of the celebration on December 25 of a Christian liturgical feast of the birth of Jesus. This was in Rome, while in Eastern Christianity the birth of Jesus was already celebrated in connection with the Epiphany on January 6. The December 25 celebration was imported into the East later: in Antioch by John Chrysostom towards the end of the 4th century, Even in the West, the January 6 celebration of the nativity of Jesus seems to have continued until after 380. In 245, Origen of Alexandria, writing about, commented that Scripture mentions only sinners as celebrating their birthdays, namely Pharaoh, who then had his chief baker hanged, and Herod, who then had John the Baptist beheaded, and mentions saints as cursing the day of their birth, namely Jeremiah  and Job . In 303, Arnobius ridiculed the idea of celebrating the birthdays of gods, a passage cited as evidence that Arnobius was unaware of any nativity celebration. Since Christmas does not celebrate Christ's birth "as God" but "as man", this is not evidence against Christmas being a feast at this time. to a tamer family-oriented and children-centered theme introduced in a 19th-century reformation. Additionally, the celebration of Christmas was banned on more than one occasion within certain Protestant groups, such as the Puritans, due to concerns that it was too pagan or unbiblical. Relation to concurrent celebrations    Prior to and through the early Christian centuries, winter festivals—especially those centered on the winter solstice—were the most popular of the year in many European pagan cultures. Reasons included the fact that less agricultural work needs to be done during the winter, as well as an expectation of better weather as spring approached. Many modern Christmas customs have been directly influenced by such festivals, including gift-giving and merrymaking from the Roman Saturnalia, greenery, lights, and charity from the Roman New Year, and Yule logs and various foods from Germanic feasts. Pagan Scandinavia celebrated a winter festival called Yule, held in the late December to early January period. As northern Europe was the last part to Christianize, its pagan traditions had a major influence on Christmas there, an example being the Koleda, which was incorporated into the Christmas carol. Scandinavians still call Christmas Jul. In English, the word Yule is synonymous with Christmas, a usage first recorded in 900. Dies Natalis Solis Invicti     Dies Natalis Solis Invicti means "the birthday of the Unconquered Sun", a festival inaugurated by the Roman emperor Aurelian to celebrate the sun god and celebrated at the winter solstice, 25 December. During the reign of the emperor Constantine, Christian writers assimilated this feast as the birthday of Jesus, associating him with the 'sun of righteousness' mentioned in . In the fourth century, John Chrysostom, who promoted the celebration on 25 December, commented on the connection: "But Our Lord, too, is born in the month of December ... the eight before the calends of January  ..., But they call it the 'Birthday of the Unconquered'. Who indeed is so unconquered as Our Lord ...? Or, if they say that it is the birthday of the Sun, He is the Sun of Justice." "Thomas Talley has shown that, although the Emperor Aurelian's dedication of a temple to the sun god in the Campus Martius  probably took place on the 'Birthday of the Invincible Sun' on December 25, the cult of the sun in pagan Rome ironically did not celebrate the winter solstice nor any of the other quarter-tense days, as one might expect." The Oxford Companion to Christian Thought remarks on the uncertainty about the order of precedence between the religious celebrations of the Birthday of the Unconquered Sun and of the birthday of Jesus, stating that the hypothesis that 25 December was chosen for celebrating the birth of Jesus on the basis of the belief that his conception occurred on 25 March "potentially establishes 25 December as a Christian festival before Aurelian's decree, which, when promulgated, might have provided for the Christian feast both opportunity and challenge". Feast established    The Chronography of 354, an illuminated manuscript compiled in Rome, is an early reference to the date of the nativity as December 25. In the East, early Christians celebrated the birth of Christ as part of Epiphany, although this festival emphasized celebration of the baptism of Jesus. Christmas was promoted in the Christian East as part of the revival of Catholicism following the death of the pro-Arian Emperor Valens at the Battle of Adrianople in 378. The feast was introduced to Constantinople in 379, and to Antioch in about 380. The feast disappeared after Gregory of Nazianzus resigned as bishop in 381, although it was reintroduced by John Chrysostom in about 400. Middle Ages    In the Early Middle Ages, Christmas Day was overshadowed by Epiphany, which in western Christianity focused on the visit of the magi. But the medieval calendar was dominated by Christmas-related holidays. The forty days before Christmas became the "forty days of St. Martin", now known as Advent. The annual indulgence in eating, dancing, singing, sporting, and card playing escalated in England, and by the 17th century the Christmas season featured lavish dinners, elaborate masques, and pageants. In 1607, King James I insisted that a play be acted on Christmas night and that the court indulge in games. In 1629, the Anglican poet John Milton penned On the Morning of Christ's Nativity, a poem that has since been read by many during Christmastide. Donald Heinz, a professor at California State University, states that Martin Luther "inaugurated a period in which Germany would produce a unique culture of Christmas, much copied in North America." Among the congregations of the Dutch Reformed Church, Christmas was celebrated as one of the principal evangelical feasts. However, in 17th century England, some groups such as the Puritans, strongly condemned the celebration of Christmas, considering it a Catholic invention and the "trappings of popery" or the "rags of the Beast". The Catholic Church also responded, promoting the festival in a more religiously oriented form. King Charles I of England directed his noblemen and gentry to return to their landed estates in midwinter to keep up their old-style Christmas generosity. The Parliament of Scotland officially abolished the observance of Christmas in 1640, claiming that the church had been "purged of all superstitious observation of days". It was not until 1958 that Christmas again became a Scottish public holiday. Despite the disapproval of many people in Britain, others continued to celebrate the Christmas season. Following the Restoration, Poor Robins Almanack contained the lines: The diary of James Woodforde, from the latter half of the 18th century, details the observance of Christmas and celebrations associated with the season over a number of years. In Colonial America, the Puritans of New England shared radical Protestant disapproval of Christmas. Celebration was outlawed in Boston from 1659 to 1681. The ban by the Pilgrims was revoked in 1681 by English governor Sir Edmund Andros, however it was not until the mid-19th century that celebrating Christmas became fashionable in the Boston region. Christmas fell out of favor in the United States after the American Revolution, when it was considered an English custom. George Washington attacked Hessian  mercenaries on the day after Christmas during the Battle of Trenton on December 26, 1776, Christmas being much more popular in Germany than in America at this time. 19th century    In the early 19th century, writers imagined Tudor Christmas as a time of heartfelt celebration. In 1843, Charles Dickens wrote the novel A Christmas Carol that helped revive the "spirit" of Christmas and seasonal merriment. Dickens sought to construct Christmas as a family-centered festival of generosity, in contrast to the community-based and church-centered observations, the observance of which had dwindled during the late 18th century and early 19th century. Superimposing his humanitarian vision of the holiday, in what has been termed "Carol Philosophy", Dickens influenced many aspects of Christmas that are celebrated today in Western culture, such as family gatherings, seasonal food and drink, dancing, games, and a festive generosity of spirit. A prominent phrase from the tale, "Merry Christmas", was popularized following the appearance of the story. This coincided with the appearance of the Oxford Movement and the growth of Anglo-Catholicism, which led a revival in traditional rituals and religious observances. The term Scrooge became a synonym for miser, with "Bah! Humbug!" dismissive of the festive spirit. In 1843, the first commercial Christmas card was produced by Sir Henry Cole. The revival of the Christmas Carol began with William Sandys "Christmas Carols Ancient and Modern", with the first appearance in print of ""The First Noel", "I Saw Three Ships", "Hark the Herald Angels Sing" and "God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen", popularized in Dickens' "A Christmas Carol". In Britain, the Christmas tree was introduced in the early 19th century following the personal union with the Kingdom of Hanover by Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, wife of King George III. In 1832, the future Queen Victoria wrote about her delight at having a Christmas tree, hung with lights, ornaments, and presents placed round it. After her marriage to her German cousin Prince

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OTHERS by Riad Ezzat

"Did You Hear What Happened to Charlotte King?" is the seventh episode of the fourth season of the American television medical drama Private Practice, which aired on ABC from September 26, 2007, to January 22, 2013. Written by Shonda Rhimes and directed by Allison Liddi-Brown, the episode

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Stress Is Your Brain Trying to Avoid Something

Stress Is Your Brain Trying to Avoid Something Stress exists in every workplace, and all of us have probably tried a few trendy stressmanagement approaches. But rather than trying the latest fad, it may be more effective to understand how stress works and where it comes from, so that you can create your own methods for dealing with it. Stress is an emotional response; like all emotional responses, it emerges from the functioning of the motivational system. Your motivational system engages goals and gives them energy so that you can pursue them. Simply put, when you succeed at your goals, you feel good, and when you don’t succeed you feel bad. Stress is a negative emotion, so the first thing we can see about stress is that it reflects a goal you are not currently achieving.  One (called the approach system) is focused on achieving desirable outcomes, while the second (called the avoidance system) is focused on avoiding undesirable outcomes. These two systems lead to distinct sets of emotions. When the approach system is active (say you’re seeking a promotion), you are happy or satisfied if you succeed and sad or disappointed if you fail. When the avoidance system is active (perhaps a client is threatening to fire you), you are fearful and stressed if you are failing, and relieved if you succeed. So we can also see stress as a reflection that there is something in your environment

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Apple just sent out invites for a press conference

Apple just sent out invites for a press conference on Wednesday, September 7. The company will most likely unveil the next iPhone. The invite doesn’t say much. Apple usually likes to give hints — but this time, it just says “See you on the 7th.” The event will be held at the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium in San Francisco. This large venue has already been used for the WWDC keynote in June. For the past three years, Apple has unveiled a new iPhone in early September. Everything indicates that Apple is going to follow the same pattern

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How to Respond When You’re Left Out of Important M

How to Respond When You’re Left Out of Important Meetings We’ve all been left off the invite list before. You find out about an important meeting — one whose outcome affects you and your team — after it happens. When you’re overlooked for a meeting it feels bad personally and professionally. Being left out can conjure up grade school emotions of being excluded or feeling like your opinion and input aren’t valued. And being the last to learn about key decisions can set your team back, and bring your leadership into question. When you don’t get a seat at the table and it’s negatively affecting your team’s ability to collaborate, coordinate, and communicate as they work toward your organization’s goals, it’s your responsibility to come forth, advocate for yourself and your team, and raise the issue in a constructive manner. Next time you discover you’re not on the invite list, don’t despair. Turn the omission into an opportunity to evaluate what you have to offer the group, determine whether the meeting aligns with you and your team’s best interests, and conduct a productive conversation. But before you start recommending that you attend every critical meeting at your company, keep the following in mind: Check your ego at the door. Ask yourself, am I

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Warren Buffett Is Betting the Airline Oligopoly Is

Warren Buffett Is Betting the Airline Oligopoly Is Here to Stay Warren Buffett got burned with an airline investment in the 1990s. He blamed the industry’s notorious low profitability on the “kamikaze pricing tactics of certain carriers” and vowed to not invest in this “death trap” sector again. In fact, he joked that he was an “aeroholic” and that he’d set up a toll-free number for himself that he could call to be talked

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'OBJECTified: Donald Trump' special

'OBJECTified: Donald Trump' special 

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Transformers: The Last Knight All Teaser Trailers

Transformers: The Last Knight All Teaser Trailers (2017) - Mark Wahlberg Movie

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POWER RANGERS Trailer (2017)

POWER RANGERS Trailer (2017)

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Donald and Melania Trump's 2005 interview as newly

Donald and Melania Trump's 2005 interview as newlyweds (CNN Larry King Live full interview)

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Donald Trump Has Nothing To Apologize For

Donald Trump Has Nothing To Apologize For

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11-10-1988 Letterman Donald Trump

11-10-1988 Letterman Donald Trump

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Donald Trump - Discussing Divorce @ The Larry King

Donald Trump - Discussing Divorce @ The Larry King Show 1990

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Donald Trump : Things you didn't know - Full New D

Donald Trump : Things you didn't know - Full New Documentary

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President Trump works as a Bill Captain,Waiter, Ro

President Trump works as a Bill Captain,Waiter, Room service, Cleaner

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Trump Family - Every thing about it - 2016

Trump Family - Every thing about it - 2016                

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5 Habits of Healthy and Fit Women

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7 Apps That You Did Not Know Existed

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10 Celebrities Who Had Weight Loss Surgery

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10 HEALTHIEST FAST FOOD BREAKFASTS

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8 Things You Must Do Before 8 Am

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Want to build muscle? Here’s what you should be ea

7 Best Muscle Building Foods

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10 EASY WAYS TO GET RID OF ACID REFLUX NATURALLY

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9 VITAMINS EVERY WOMAN SHOULD TAKE

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10 Ways To Clear Storage Space In iPhone

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7 Ways To Get Rid of the Overload of Body Toxins

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Improve Your Mood With These 9 Superfoods

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15 Apps You Should Have In Your Phone

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8 REASONS TO DUMP BOTTLED WATER

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6 Secrets Of Irresistible People

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10 Shocking Photos Of Celebrities Without Makeup

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10 PROVEN BENEFITS OF GREEN TEA by Riad Ezzat

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6 WAYS TO INVEST MONEY

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10 MOST EXPENSIVE COLLEGES IN THE WORLD

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7 TRICKS TO LOSING WEIGHT WITHOUT TRYING

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10 BEST ACCESSORIES FOR THE IPHONE 7 AND 7 PLUS

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10 DANGERS OF E CIGARETTES

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10 Ways The Avocado Is Great For Your Health

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10 Ways The Avocado Is Great For ... by Riad Ezzat

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Benefits of Drinking Water in the Morning

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THE FATE OF THE FURIOUS Trailer (2017)

THE FATE OF THE FURIOUS Trailer (2017)

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SPIDER-MAN: Homecoming Trailer (2017)

SPIDER-MAN: Homecoming Trailer (2017)

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BAYWATCH Trailer (2017)

BAYWATCH Trailer (2017)

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10 Of The Most Powerful Passports In The World

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7 Habits That’ll Boost Your Metabolism And Keep Yo

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No Gym Equipment Needed: 7 Best Exercises You Can

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6 Super Powered Humans That Science Can’t Explain

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10 THINGS YOU PROBABLY DIDN’T WANT TO KNOW ABOUT R

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10 REASONS WHY SHE DOESN’T CALL OR TEXT YOU BACK

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11 WAYS TO ASK A GIRL OUT

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Your Next Visit To McDonalds Maybe Different After

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9 SIGNS YOU ARE BIPOLAR

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10 Cool Hidden Tricks of Google to Keep You Entert

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7 Ways To Build Muscle

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10 SIGNS YOU’RE ARE ABOUT TO BE FIRED

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9 WEIRD MYSTERIES THAT ARE YET TO BE EXPLAINED

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5 Reasons iPhones Are Steps Ahead of Androids

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6 Foods That Naturally Whiten Your Teeth

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Top 10 Disney Movies of All Time

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9 Scientifically Verified Ways To Appear More Attr

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This Is The OBAMA’s New Home After The White House

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Which Egg Do You Think Came From An Actually Healt

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Can You Answer This Quiz Correctly On Your First T

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10 Real Life Giants You Won’t Believe Exist

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=81mXAkFEkMs

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37 Photos Taken The Very Moment Before Disaster St