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When I started in photography things were very dif

 When I started in photography things were very different. Fortunately for me I learned from my father. He started me out with an inexpensive instamatic camera. Now remember in those days film could only be used once and it was not cheap. I learned to take pictures selectively. That meant that people always had to pose for me in order not to waste film. I would say that this is where or how you develop an "eye" for picture taking. Getting the shot right the first time was important. I did not have the luxury of having rolls and rolls of film. Since an instamatic camera did not give me the capability of manual focus or zoom the prints were relatively basic. With my first 35mm camera I had to develop other skills. Now it was time to learn what my camera could do. Manual focus, aperture setting, lighting, shutter speed and proper framing. Then there was processing, developing and printing which also came at a cost. My father had a darkroom where he did this himself and taught me to do it also. I had to take time to improve my skills at photography. Things are different today in the digital age. Technology makes it possible for everyone to have a camera at all times that is capable of taking stills and video . This means that just about everyone can take pictures but that doesn't make everyone

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Time to start building your knowledge base

Time to start building your knowledge base. 1- CCD (Charged-Couple Device) is a semiconductor technology used to build light-sensitive electronic devices such as cameras and image scanners. A digital camera has a sensor which is positioned behind the lens. When you press the shutter button, the sensor measures the light striking it and creates a digital image much in the same way a photocopier makes a copy of a document. This image is stored on removable storage called a memory card 2-ISO (International Standard Organization) This mean how sensitive the image is to the amount of light present. The sensitivity is reacting speed by light. A high value of ISO means you can take a picture without a flash even if the amount of light is low. ISO Classifications: Low speed: ISO 25-50 Middle speed: ISO 100-200 High speed ISO: 400+ As a beginner, use the minimum possible ISO setting You should increase the ISO setting only when the shutter speed is too slow to hand hold. You will need a faster shutter speed to capture action, or you need a smaller aperture for depth of field. Usually the ISO setting of a regular digital camera is equivalent to 100 or Auto. You can check to see if it can be changed by referring to the manual.   Point and shoot vs DSLR There are two very different classes of digital cameras: point-and-shoot (p/s, fixed-lens) and Digital-Single-LensReflex (DSLR). The digital cameras most people have are point-and-shoot cameras which are small and cute. On the other hand, the DSLR cameras are larger like the one pictured here. DSLR cameras are usually for professional photographers, but currently many non-professionals are interested in using DSLR cameras. Even if two cameras have the same number of pixels, a DSLR camera is more expensive than a point-and-shoot camera. In addition, because DSLR cameras have a larger CCD, the quality of the photo is better. However, don’t be disappointed in having a point-and-shoot camera. Recently, those p/s cameras have many functions like DSLRs. A point and shoot camera with a range finder is usually smaller, lighter a quieter than a DSLR camera. The point and shoot camera knows what the exposure should be because the image sensor is exposed to the image while you are taking